Just a Pinch of South

For those of us who grew up in the South but have moved elsewhere, we love our roots and all they have provided. There's a lot that I've come to appreciate about the South. But let's be honest, most of us don't want to go back to "full Southern." We're happy with just a pinch here and there to add flavor to the life we live now. If you are not a Southerner, perhaps you'll come to better appreciate the little gifts the American South has given and continues to give our culture. This blog is written by Elizabeth Bloodworth. Find out more about me at elizabethbloodworth.com. Photos are not mine unless specified. Email me at justapinchofsouth @ gmail dot com. I tweet at @apinchofsouth and my other tumblr is called "everythingthatdoesntfitelsewhere" which is just what it sounds like.

Given the width and breadth of said hair, I consider myself fortunate to have been born and raised in the South where such styles have been in unrelenting vogue for generations…During the course of my 40-some-odd years I have witnessed hairdos high enough to intercept NASA communications and wide enough to block out the August sun.
excerpt from Pamela Wright’s Back to my Roots which appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 13, 2014.
If we can’t do it in New York, we have no business going anywhere else.

Woody Faulk

Vice President of Design and Innovation, Chick-fil-A

(USA Today reports Chick-fil-A will be opening multiple stores in NYC)

Finally

But there is one thing about it—once you have lived in New York and it has become your home, no place else is good enough. All of everything is concentrated here, population, theater, art, writing, publishing, importing, business, murder, mugging, luxury, poverty. It is all of everything. It goes all right. It is tireless and its air is charged with energy.

- John Steinbeck, from Autobiography: The Making of a New Yorker, 1953.

Mostly Just a Pinch of South is about, well, the South, but every now and then I like to give a nod to where I live now.

Top 10 Things I Am Missing About The South Right Now

1. Not Freezing
2. Not Freezing
3. Not Freezing
4. Not Freezing
5. Spring. Also known as Not Freezing.
6. Not Freezing
7. Not Freezing
8. Not Freezing
9. Not Freezing
10. Manners. Also Not Freezing.

I wrote thank you notes to several colleagues who worked hard at a conference I was responsible for. 

It’s as if they’d never received one ever before. I’ve been getting “thank you for the thank you” emails today and yesterday. Perhaps because we are up North?

Your momma had it right when she made you write all those thank you notes as a kid. It’s a good habit. It can even be a little powerful.

I wrote thank you notes to several colleagues who worked hard at a conference I was responsible for.

It’s as if they’d never received one ever before. I’ve been getting “thank you for the thank you” emails today and yesterday. Perhaps because we are up North?

Your momma had it right when she made you write all those thank you notes as a kid. It’s a good habit. It can even be a little powerful.

This NewYorker cartoon by Roz Chast sums up how we can feel in New York City. New Yorkers can be a cranky bunch. There are so many other cranky New Yorkers here, I’d just like to be left alone and get stuff done, thank you very much.
We get used to carving out our own personal non-interaction space in a crowded city. Then I travel South, and everyone is so friendly and chatty. They will not accept my little personal bubble of privacy. I will be stopped on the street by an acquaintance, the check out girl will inquire after my father, the waiter wants to talk about his day.  They are so nice about it, though, that I find, even without wanting to, the hard place in my heart melts. And there I am asking them how they are doing, and chatting about the weather. This is probably the better version of me.

This NewYorker cartoon by Roz Chast sums up how we can feel in New York City. New Yorkers can be a cranky bunch. There are so many other cranky New Yorkers here, I’d just like to be left alone and get stuff done, thank you very much.

We get used to carving out our own personal non-interaction space in a crowded city. Then I travel South, and everyone is so friendly and chatty. They will not accept my little personal bubble of privacy. I will be stopped on the street by an acquaintance, the check out girl will inquire after my father, the waiter wants to talk about his day.  They are so nice about it, though, that I find, even without wanting to, the hard place in my heart melts. And there I am asking them how they are doing, and chatting about the weather. This is probably the better version of me.

(Source: newyorker.com, via palindromeadventures)